Citizens of the Western Balkans provide almost completely the same answers when it comes to their trust in institutions.

By Sofija Mandić (BCSP) / Photo: Building in Tirana, Albania
@bezbednost_org

The education, the police, the healthcare and local self-government are the institutions that citizens trust the most (Chart 1). Compared to the 2016 results, the list of most trusted institutions has remained unchanged. Trust in the education system is again – and without exception – in the first position; it is trusted the most by the citizens of Montenegro (71%) and Serbia (68%), and the least by those of Albania (55%) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (53%).

Chart 1: Institutions that are trusted in the Western Balkans
Q: How much do you trust the following institutions? Please answer using the scale from 1 to 4, where: 1 means that you do not trust the particular institution at all, 2 that you mainly do not trust it, 3 that you mainly trust it, and 4 that you completely trust that institution.


There is a high degree of consent among the respondents as regards the least trusted institutions. Citizens show insufficient trust in their representative bodies (61%), which are followed by the courts (60%), the prosecution (59%) and the authorities charged with fighting corruption (57%) (Chart 2).

On average, they distrust the representative bodies the most, most notably in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where seven out of ten citizens lack confidence in the parliament. The average level of distrust in institutions has changed in relation to the year 2016; this year, instead of the media, the anti-corruption bodies appear on the list of four least trusted institutions.

Chart 2: Institutions that are not trusted
Q: How much do you trust the following institutions? Please answer using the scale from 1 to 4, where: 1 means that you do not trust the particular institution at all, 2 that you mainly do not trust it, 3 that you mainly trust it and 4 that you completely trust that institution.

In comparison with 2016, the biggest change in trust in institutions was observed in Macedonia, Albania, and Kosovo (Table 1). It should be borne in mind that parliamentary elections, conducted immediately after the survey, could have had a certain impact on the increase of trust in institutions in Kosovo. The elections in Macedonia took place about six months prior to the survey, which also could have caused a significant increase in confidence in individual institutions.

A significant loss of confidence in all institutions was noted in Bosnia and Herzegovina, while the citizens of Serbia lost trust in the majority of their institutions.

Table 1: The most significant changes in the trust shown to institutions in 2016 and 2017
Q: How much do you trust the following institutions? Please answer using the scale from 1 to 4, where: 1 means that you do not trust the particular institution at all, 2 that you mainly do not trust it, 3 that you mainly trust it, and 4 that you completely trust that institution.


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TAGS: AlbaniaAnalysisBosnia and HerzegovinaKosovoMacedoniaMontenegroPerceptionPolicePulseSerbiaWestern Balkans